Anisotropic Electromagnetic Force Phenomena

Votes: 12
Views: 737
Previous Next

Sunatori's Effect refers to Anisotropic Electromagnetic Force Phenomena which were recently discovered by Simon Sunatori, P.Eng./ing., M.Eng. (Engineering Physics/Génie physique), F.N.A., IEEE-SM, WFS-LM, BNR/NT (MSS).

Anisotropy manifests itself in dramatic fashion as unexpected physical phenomena of magnetic attraction-repulsion, which is analogous to love-hate relationship. Experiments appear to defy basic law of nature, raising more questions than answers. Such a fundamental discovery could lead to some industrial applications in future.

Homo-Magnetic Like-Pole Attraction

Conventional wisdom dictates that like poles repel and opposite poles attract. Thus, the S-pole of a small-diameter rod-shaped or disc-shaped permanent magnet attaches to the N-pole of a large-diameter disc-shaped permanent magnet as expected, as shown in Figure 1, albeit only to the peripheral region. However, the N-pole of a small-diameter rod-shaped or disc-shaped permanent magnet attaches to the central region of the N-pole of a large-diameter disc-shaped permanent magnet in concentric alignment, as shown in Figure 2, due to temporary magnetic-pole inversion!

It is known that a strong external magnetic field can permanently alter the sizes and orientations of magnetic domains in a permanent magnet. This is not the case here because the central region of the large-diameter disc-shaped permanent magnet has weaker magnetic field (i.e., sparser magnetic field lines) than the peripheral region of the large-diameter disc-shaped permanent magnet does.

Ferromagnetic Boundary Repulsion

Conventional wisdom dictates that a permanent magnet only attracts an unmagnetized object made of ferromagnetic material (Fe, Co, Ni, etc.). However, a linear unmagnetized object made of ferromagnetic material experiences a repulsive force exactly at the boundary between the 2 polarities of a permanent magnet! The effect shows up only if the linear unmagnetized object made of ferromagnetic material attempts to touch the permanent magnet in parallel to the N-S boundary. If the linear unmagnetized object made of ferromagnetic material attempts to touch the permanent magnet in perpendicular to the N-S boundary, then an attractive force is exerted as expected.

The repulsive force is best felt by an extended paperclip made of steel as a probe, approaching the N-S boundary of a spherical or hemispherical rare-earth magnet from a distance above pointing towards the centre of the rare-earth magnet, as shown in Figure 3 and Figure 4.

Ferromagnetic Penetrative Levitation

Conventional wisdom dictates that a permanent magnet does not repel an unmagnetized object made of ferromagnetic material (Fe, Co, Ni, etc.). However, a small rod-shaped unmagnetized object (e.g., a cut nail) made of ferromagnetic material placed just above a ring-shaped permanent magnet causes magnetic levitation along the central axis of the ring-shaped permanent magnet due to induced magnetism! The repulsive force is quite unstable, so the rod-shaped unmagnetized object made of ferromagnetic material must be supported by a tube (e.g., a plastic straw) above the ring-shaped rare-earth magnet, as shown in Figure 5.

Voting

Voting is closed!

  • ABOUT THE ENTRANT

  • Name:
    Simon Sunatori
  • Type of entry:
    individual
  • Profession:
    Engineer/Designer
  • Number of times previously entering contest:
    10
  • Simon's favorite design and analysis tools:
    RunRev LiveCode, iWorks (Numbers.app, Pages.app)
  • Simon's hobbies and activities:
    igloo building, cross-country skiing, cycling
  • Simon belongs to these online communities:
    InventNet Forum
  • Simon is inspired by:
    Leonardo da Vinci, Albert Einstein
  • Patent status:
    none